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Minneapolis Riverfront News

Covering life, work, and play in the Historic Mill District and Downtown Minneapolis Riverfront neighborhoods. Have an opinion, local news or events to share?  Contact us.

Friday
Jul202018

Illuminate the Lock Returns to the Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam in September

Via a July 20 e-newsletter from Northern Lights.mn:

Artist concept sketch, Returning the River by Mike Hoyt, Dameun Strange and Molly Van Avery, 2018. Courtesy the artists.

We are pleased to announce that Returning the River, an experimental, participatory opera about the Mississippi River that explores collective dreams of freedom by Mike Hoyt, Dameun Strange, and Molly Van Avery has been selected for the next Illuminate the Lock project, September 20-22, at the Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam.

Returning the River is a night of poetry, projection, and music that illuminates a future where both rivers and people are liberated, where we celebrate wildness, and where we practice reciprocal relationships between all bodies of water, including one another's. The project consists of a series of visual projections by Mike Hoyt, a soundscape arranged by Dameun Strange, and singers above and in the Lock performing a libretto by Molly Van Avery. Audience members will be invited to sing and hold water drawn up from the Lock to talk to or listen to, then pour back into the river to make its way to the sea.

Illuminate the Lock is a partnership between Northern Lights.mn, Mississippi Park Connection, and the National Park Service with support from the Saint Anthony Falls Heritage Board and the US Army Corps of Engineers.
Thursday
Jul192018

Opinion: Mayor should retain executive authority, City Council should assume policy making authority, says Council Member Steve Fletcher

By Ward 3 Council Member Steve Fletcher

In the wake of the death of Thurman Blevins, Council Member Cam Gordon has proposed a charter amendment on the Mayor and Council’s authority over the Minneapolis Police Department. Before we have even seen proposed language, the debate about it has become highly politicized, and I think that is a shame.

Charter amendments should never be about the current Council and Mayor. These are choices that will impact governance ten mayors from now, and who knows if you’ll feel the same way about that Mayor or your Council Member, or not? Who knows what the political dynamic of the day will be?

Opponents of the amendment claim that shifting authority over MPD to the Council would cause complete chaos, and that the responsible thing is to maintain the status quo. Complete chaos sounds really bad. The status quo is really bad. I would not vote to put a choice between chaos and the status quo on the ballot, if that were actually the choice. I don’t think it is.

What if, instead, we focused on responding to the clear community demand for increased public oversight and transparency for the Police Department? What if the question we asked was: “How do we maximize Minneapolis residents’ access and voice in decisions about MPD?” I like that question a lot better.

The Mayor and the Council serve different functions, and giving either one “complete control” over the Police Department, as our charter currently gives the Mayor, misses the opportunity to take advantage of each office’s strengths. The City Council is, by design, a deliberative legislative body. We do our business in public, hold public hearings, hold our meetings at set times, televise our proceedings, and publish public agendas in advance. The cost of our transparent, predictable processes is speed. Nothing moves very quickly through the Minneapolis City Council. The Mayor, by contrast, is an executive, and much less encumbered by process. The Mayor can be decisive, and can fulfill their duties largely behind closed doors.

I am inclined to believe that shifting legislative authority to the City Council would increase transparency and public access to decision-making. Right now, policy decisions can happen between the Mayor and the Police Chief in a back room. The Council can hold public discussion on police-related issues, but the Chief has no formal obligation to attend our discussions in person or to enact policies recommended by the City Council.

Many of the people who have contacted me about this issue have incorrectly asserted that the Council already has legislative authority over the Police Department. The current charter clearly states that we do not. We can make recommendations, and use the budget for leverage, but cannot enact policy. Most of the constituents who call my office about police policy are asking me to change it - not asking me to politely ask the Mayor to change it. Shifting policy-making authority to the Council would bring public safety discussions out of the back room and into the daylight, and align the charter better with what, in my experience, many residents already assume it says.

I am also inclined to believe that the Mayor should retain executive authority -- that the chain of command should end with the Mayor. The Police Department is different from other departments. High-stakes decisions regularly have to be made very quickly, and the consequences of inaction are sometimes very high. Situations where lives are at risk, or that have huge, immediate public consequences can’t wait for a committee cycle. Having the Mayor in a strong executive role overseeing the police ensures that an elected civilian is involved in police oversight.

I have heard many people repeat the line that the Police Department should report to one boss rather than thirteen. I understand why people are concerned about that, but I think it misdiagnoses the problem. In urgent situations, instead of thirteen bosses, the Chief would, in practice, report to no boss at all. The Council would not be able to respond under our rules in a timely way to urgent situations, and quick tactical decisions would end up being made by the Chief alone. Taking the Mayor out of the executive oversight role would decrease police oversight by elected civilians.

My instinct is to seek to improve public oversight and transparency by working with my colleagues to craft language that preserves the Mayor’s executive power, while shifting legislative power to the Council. I think we owe it to our constituents to present a better choice than either chaos or the status quo, and I’ll vote in favor of the introduction on Friday to see if we can get that done. I think we can, though I am much less convinced that we can or should do it on the aggressive timeline necessary to put it on this year’s ballot.

Changing the charter is a big deal. I think it makes sense to give voters the choice to increase their access to our democracy by affirming the Mayor’s executive role and moving Police Department policy into the daylight of Council chambers.

Minneapolis Council Member Steve Fletcher

Thursday
Jul192018

Editorial: Mayor Frey Correct in Opposing Police Oversight Proposal

Mayor makes the right call opposing the "14 Boss" plan

A proposal is working its way through the Minneapolis City Council that would have the Chief of Police report to 14 individuals - all 13 council members and the mayor. Presently, the charter provides the mayor with authority to “make all rules and regulations and … general and special orders necessary to operating the police department.” This proposal is ill conceived at best. To put it simply, no law enforcement entity can function with 14 bosses.

The stated reason for the change is improved accountability, but it's impact would be exactly the opposite. Right now Mayor Jacob Frey and Police Chief Arradondo are the responsible individuals for the police department. It's clear to the voters, it's clear who to credit when things go well and who to blame when they don't. The proposal, however, would dilute responsibility by spreading it across 13 council offices.

Day to day policing decisions would also suffer because the Chief would not have clarity of reporting. Does the Chief report to a different boss depending on the ward? Are we creating a situation in which policing decisions in the 3rd Ward half of downtown are entirely different from those made in the 7th Ward half? These questions have remained unanswered.

The present structure of reporting also allows for the Mayor to make quick, decisive decisions in minutes if necessary. The council process (which is legislative in nature) would take over a month for the same outcome. There is a reason why no other large city in the country uses this structure - it simply doesn't work practically.

Mayor Jacob Frey has mounted an opposition to the proposal, and the Star Tribune reports that the council vote breakdown is relatively close, with 3rd Ward Council Member Steve Fletcher being the swing vote. Let's hope this City Council acts responsibly and recognizes this proposal for the bad idea that it is.

Wednesday
Jul182018

Minneapolis 2040: Comment Period Continues Through July 22

Via a July 17 e-newsletter from the City of Minneapolis:

Comment Period Continues Through July 22

If you have already provided your feedback on the plan, thank you! If you haven’t weighed in yet, you have until July 22 to comment on the draft Comprehensive Plan. The draft plan is available at minneapolis2040.com, with opportunities to comment throughout the website.

Below are ways you can comment:

- Comment on individual draft policies. Explore the policies by navigating through the goals or topics.
- Comment on the proposed Land Use and Built Form Maps via the interactive map.
- Download the Meeting-in-a-Box tool kit to host your own engagement meetings and report back.
- Send us an email with your comments. Attach formal correspondence in response to this draft plan, or even a photo of a place that represents your vision for the future of Minneapolis. Our email address is 2040@minneapolismn.gov.

What's next?

Staff will take the comments received through July 22 and use them to revise the draft plan. A revised draft will be released in late September, with consideration by the City Planning Commission in late October and the full City Council in December. The approval process will include a formal public hearing at which anyone can submit written comment or speak in person. Specific dates and times will be announced later this summer. Please stay connected to the process by:

- Following us on Twitter @Mpls2040
- Signing up for our email list

Wednesday
Jul182018

11th Avenue S Redesign Update from Council Member Fletcher

Friends –
 
This week, city staff from the Public Works Department came back with me to the Stonebridge to present a significantly revised plan to address the traffic concerns residents have raised about 11th Ave. S. from the river to Washington Ave.  I was really happy with the work our staff accomplished on this plan, and most attendees at the meeting seemed to agree. I know some people weren’t able to attend, and I’ve heard anecdotally that the notice didn’t get to everyone it should have, so I wanted to re-cap the meeting and send the presentation so you can get up to speed.  I’m happy to meet up or check in by phone if you have questions or comments you want to share and weren’t able to attend.
 
Here's the presentation (attached), which includes a plan for the intersection of 2nd and 10th to slow down traffic, an innovative plan for the intersection of 2nd and 11th to make that intersection safer and more appropriate, and a new layout for 11th Ave. S. between 2nd and Washington.
 
Some highlights:

  • A refuge area in the middle of 2nd Street at 10th, creating a MUCH safer crossing for pedestrians, and to cause cars to slow down.
  • A ‘protected intersection’ design at 2nd Street and 11th will limit cars’ ability to turn at unsafe speeds, as many currently do.
  • Parking is eliminated on the Bridgewater side of 11th Ave, eliminating sightline barriers that were making it unsafe to turn out of the driveway.
  • At Washington, 11th Ave will have a right turn lane, a through lane, and a left turn lane, which should ease traffic back-ups and make it easier to navigate.
  • Extended the left-turn lane toward Washington, so that more cars can wait there to turn without blocking the whole street.
  • Maintains safe, protected bike lanes.  

Also worth noting: Jono Cowgill tells me the Park Board is considering a stop sign at 11th and the Parkway, based on our feedback.
 
There were a couple of follow-up items based on feedback we’ve received at the meeting and since the meeting: 

  • Traffic safety staff will look at sight-lines at 12th and 2nd to see if eliminating a parking space or two at that intersection would create better visibility for cars turning off of 12th.
  • Some people feel strongly that we need a left turn lane on the Northbound side of 11th Ave S, as we currently have. There are significant trade-offs to squeezing in an additional lane there beyond eliminating those four parking spaces, so we’re having engineering re-look at that question to see if it’s possible without messing too many other things up. Ultimately, if traffic is flowing better, the extra lane in that direction wouldn’t be needed, and if we shorten the Southbound left turn lane to make room for a Northbound lane, we could jam up Southbound traffic and still be making that turn harder rather than easier. So, it’s not a simple question, and we probably won’t reach consensus. No matter which choice we make on this question, we’ll need to monitor traffic (as PW staff has committed to doing) to make sure we’ve made the best decision for how to use the limited space. Lanes can be repainted, so we can try something and then make adjustments.

Again, thanks to everyone who has invested time in providing feedback and helping us improve this traffic design. We’ve really gotten something significantly better because so many in the community have worked together on this. 
 
En avant,
Steve
 
Steve Fletcher
Council Member, Ward 3
City of Minneapolis – City Council
350 S. Fifth St.  - Room 307
Minneapolis, MN 55415
612-673-2203
steve.fletcher@minneapolismn.gov

 

11TH AVENUE SOUTH REDESIGN PRESENTATION
11TH AVENUE SOUTH REDESIGN PROJECT WEBSITE

11th Avenue S Protected Bikeway 

Tuesday
Jul172018

July 17 is National Tattoo Day!

Submitted by Minnesota musician, Rob Morgan: 

Happy National Tattoo Day!

Whether you’ve been thinking about getting your first tattoo or simply curious about what it’s like, this entertaining audio guide is guaranteed to replace any hesitation, fear or questions you may have with informed confidence.

Join Rob & Sarah Morgan with special guests Jorge Janelle Figueroa as Janelle gets her first tattoo. While doing so, Rob will explain “The Five P’s Of Getting Your First Tattoo” (Place vs Person, Price, Process, Pain and Post-Care).

 “A Guide To Getting Your First Tattoo”

WARNING: Listening to “A Guide To Getting Your First Tattoo” may cause sudden and undeniable urges to get a tattoo and has been known to invoke sudden spikes in confidence, transforming the listener into a go-to “Tattoo Expert" in their circle of friends.

Podcast: Rob Morgan Is A Curious Person

Tuesday
Jul172018

Road Closures for Aquatennial Events, July 18 and 21

Wednesday, July 18th - Life Time Torchlight 5K
7pm – 9pm
West River Parkway - From N 4th Avenue to Portland Avenue
Stone Arch Bridge
SE Main Street - From SE 3rd Street to 6th Street SE

Saturday, July 21st - Aquatennial & Fireworks
8am – 10pm
West River Parkway from 4th Avenue to Portland Avenue

Sunday
Jul152018

Scenes for the July 14 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

Based on this sampling of produce, I'd say summer is officially in full swing at the Mill City Farmers Market!

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers MarketFor items on the more exotic side, check out the Bean Market - you'll find produce such as water spinach (left, with the long, skinny leaves) and Chinese long beans.

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers MarketRyan Billig of Tempah Tantrum got a visit from his toddler.

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

Lakewinds Food Co-op, a MCFM sponsor, is a great place to find locally made, small batch foods. Below, Jen's Jars and 3 Bear Oats were two product lines promoted by Lakewinds as part of their Maker to Market program.

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

June 30, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

Below, Well Rooted Teas, Radiate Activewear and United Goods are all new MCFM vendors for the 2018 season.

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

Below, Jim Benson of Crookedwood made some specially shaped scraping paddles for use by bakers who keep a canister of sourdough starter on hand. Pick up a sourdough starter sample from Sunrise Flour Mill and create your own sourdough batch at home.

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

It just wasn't possible to capture the detail and beauty of these metal figures from House of Talents:

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

So many gorgeous flowers! Pick up a ready-made bouquet, or create your own arrangement.

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

Milly the goat!

July 14, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

Sunday
Jul152018

2nd Round of RFP's for Guthrie Liner Parcel

Several developers are interested in building on a vacant, city-owned lot next in between the Guthrie Theater and Washington Avenue in downtown Minneapolis.

Developers submit proposals for city-owned site near Guthrie in Minneapolis
Four developers have submitted possible plans for the vacant strip. Read article from last week in the Strib...

Downtown Minneapolis residents want a say in city's sale of Guthrie Liner Parcel

Initial plans fell through when Mortenson Development announced it was abandoning a plan to build a 10-story tower with a 235-room Hyatt Centric hotel on the property. Read article from last year in the Strib...

Sunday
Jul152018

In the News - Downtown & the Riverfront Neighborhoods

Our weekly digest of stories about Downtown Minneapolis and the Central Riverfront neighborhoods:

WEEK JULY 16, 2108

Thrivent plans to sell its last lot for development in downtown Minneapolis
Micro-unit apartment building in East Town is planned by developer.

Scooter-share arrives in Minneapolis
A proposed ordinance regulating “low power vehicles” aimed to get Minneapolis out ahead of the fast-growing scooter-sharing industry — but the scooters got here first.

Minneapolis City Council committee to vote on ordinance to regulate electric scooters
New rental business could mean electric vehicles will be scattered around city.

How to ride the Bird
Dockless electric scooters are popping up across the Twin Cities. Here's a video guide of how and where to ride.

Click to read more ...

Sunday
Jul152018

The Week Ahead in Mill City

Friday
Jul132018

Restaurant Week, Summer 2018: July 15-20

Restaurant Week

Celebrate the best of Twin Cities dining with a week's worth of great deals in some of the Twin Cities trendiest and best restaurants from July 15 - 20. Participating restaurants will serve two to three course, prix fixe menus for just $10 to $35 per person. (beverage, tax and gratuity not included)

Click this link for the list of participating downtown restaurants.

Wednesday
Jul112018

Tickets for the October 24 Minnesota Sports Awards Now on Sale

Via a July 11 Press Release from Meet Minneapolis:


The second annual awards gala, presented by Sports Minneapolis, recognizes
Minnesota’s top athletes and coaches

Today, Sports Minneapolis, powered by Meet Minneapolis, announces tickets are now on sale for the second annual Minnesota Sports Awards. The gala event will take place on Oct. 24, 2018, at U.S. Bank Stadium and will feature the top athletes in the state as well as local sports celebrities. The Minnesota Sports Awards, presented by Sports Minneapolis, recognize the outstanding achievement of high school, collegiate and professional athletes, many of whom will be on hand for the evening’s awards ceremony.

Nominations are still being accepted for deserving athletes, including the Professional Athlete of the Year presented by FOX Sports North (FSN), as well as the Minnesota Sports Moment of the Year, the Courage Award, sponsored by TRIA, plus a new award for Minnesota’s Coach of the Year. The deadline to nominate high school and collegiate athletes is July 15.

Awards will be given in the following categories: 

  • High School Athlete of the Year (Male/Female)
  • Collegiate Athlete of the Year (Male/Female)
  • Professional Athlete of the Year – presented by FOX Sports North
  • Coach of the Year
  • Minnesota Sports Moment of the Year
  • Courage Award – presented by TRIA

The public is invited to attend this event which includes a silent auction, dinner and an entertaining awards ceremony featuring the winning athletes and coaches, as well as a number of high-profile sports celebrities. 

  • Oct. 24 at U.S. Bank Stadium
  • Tickets start at $195
  • Purchase online
  • Doors open at 5:30 p.m.
  • Show begins at 7:30 p.m.

A portion of the proceeds from the Minnesota Sports Awards will benefit the Sanneh Foundation, created by former Major League Soccer player and native Minnesotan, Tony Sanneh.  The Sanneh Foundation seeks to support and empower youth through programs targeting both physical and emotional well-being.

The second annual Minnesota Sports Awards will be carried live by FSN across multiple digital platforms and rebroadcast at a later date.

Wednesday
Jul112018

Updates from Mississippi Watershed Management Organization (MWMO)

Excerpts from the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization (MWMO) July 10 e-newsletter:

Westminster

Exploring the High-Tech Stormwater Reuse System at Westminster Presbyterian Church

In January, Westminster Presbyterian Church opened the doors to its new $48 million, 49,000-square-foot addition along the Nicollet Mall in downtown Minneapolis. The church and its landscape are a case study in environmental leadership. Learn how Westminster and its partners pushed the envelope on sustainability with a state-of-the-art stormwater reuse system that is a first of its kind in the city.  More Info

Four Fun Ways to Experience the Mississippi River this Summer

If you live in the Twin Cities and haven’t spent time up close and personal with the Mississippi River, you’re missing out. It’s hard to think of another major metro area that has a national park running through the middle of it, and with lots of free or low-cost ways to enjoy the river, there’s no excuse not to get out and experience this natural icon.

Whether you’re into paddling, biking, hiking, wildlife-spotting or just some shoreline relaxation, the Mississippi River has something to offer you. Below is our summer guide to experiencing the river. We’re obviously biased toward things happening inside our watershed, so feel free to add your own suggestions in the comments. What’s your favorite way to enjoy with the river?  More Info

Hall's Island Restoration

Wondering what the deal is with that new island near downtown Minneapolis? This video explains all. Learn how the restoration of Hall's Island will benefit people, wildlife and water quality in the Mississippi River. Watch on YouTube

Monday
Jul092018

2018 Sister Cities Day is July 22 at Nicollet Island Pavilion

Sister Cities Day at Nicollet Island Pavilion

Sunday, July 22nd, 1-5 PM, at the Nicollet Island Pavilion

Come be part of this annual event where we celebrate over 40 years of being part of the Sister Cities program. All 12 of the Minneapolis Sister Cities will be celebrated with a FREE Ice Cream Social and gathering at the Nicollet Island Pavilion. This family event features multi-cultural entertainment, children activities, ice cream and refreshments. The event highlights all of Minneapolis’ International Sister Cities, with a special spotlight this year on the 10th anniversary of our Sister City with Cuernavaca, Mexico!

This even is free and open to the public.

Minneapolis Sister Cities Day Official Program:

1:00 - Welcome remarks: Bill Deef, SVP Public Affairs – Meet Minneapolis
Announcer for the program: Michael Hernandez, Director of Visitor Services – Meet Minneapolis

1:05 - Speaker: Teresa Olson, Honorary Consul of Chile in Minnesota
Minneapolis - Santiago, Chile Sister Cities

1:10  - Iraqi American Reconciliation Project
Minneapolis - Najaf, Iraq Sister Cities
Speaker: Jessica Belt

1:15-1:35 - Songs of Hope - a performing arts summer camp representing countries from around the world

1:40 - Minneapolis Ibaraki City Sister City Association
Speaker: Karl Reinhard 

1:40-2:00 - Japanese Dancers from Ibaraki City, Japan

2:00 - Remarks from elected officials
Melvin Tennant, President & CEO – Meet Minneapolis
Recognition of the 10th Anniversary of Minneapolis and Cuernavaca, Mexico Sister City Relationship
Speaker: Columba Reyes, Chair – Minneapolis Cuernavaca Sister City Association

2:15-2:35 - Ballet Folklorico Mexico Lindo

2:40 - Speaker: Ralph Beha, Chair – US China Peoples Friendship Association – MN Chapter
Minneapolis – Harbin, China Sister Cities

2:45-3:15 Hongde Choy Li Fut Lion Dancers
Hongde Choy Li Fut Kung Fu Students

3:15 - Speaker: Degha Shabbeleh – Minnesota Friends of Bosaso
Minneapolis – Bosaso, Somalia Sister Cities

3:15-3:35 - Somali Museum Dance Troupe

3:40 - Speaker: Coventry Cowens, International Leadership Institute
Minneapolis – Eldoret, Kenya Sister Cities

3:45 - Speaker: Representative of Minneapolis Kuopio Partnership
Minneapolis – Kuopio, Finland Sister Cities

3:50 - Speaker:  Gail Beske, President – Minneapolis Tours Sister Cities
Minneapolis – Tours, France Sister Cities

3:55 - Speakers: Katie Fournier and Miranda Striegel, Co-Chairs – Minneapolis Uppsala Friendship Committee      
Minneapolis – Uppsala, Sweden Sister Cities     
 
4:00-4:20 - Twin Cities Swedish Folk Dancers

4:30 - Enso Daiko – Taiko Drumming Group (TENT)

Sunday
Jul082018

Scenes for the July 7 Mill City Farmers Market

Three new vendors debuted at the July 7 Mill City Farmers Market: Sudify, Furniture by DeGarmo and Root to Rise Kitchen.

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers MarketSusan Storck of Sudify transforms objects found in nature into wearable pieces of art.

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers MarketTamara and TiAnna DeGarmo of Furniture by DeGarmo use wood sourced from local sawmills that salvage wind fallen trees to create  furniture, kitchen accessories and other homewares.

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers MarketHeather Klein's Root To Rise Kitchen is a 100% plant-based food business. All their dishes are made from scratch using high quality, mostly organic ingredients.

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

Yes! Raspberries are finally here! :)

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

Milly the goat!

July 7, 2018 Mill City Farmers Market

Saturday
Jul072018

“Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” Art Exhibit Opening at The Mill Yard at Stonebridge Lofts, July 18

The Mill Yard presents a new show, Oh, the Places You’ll Go!, showcasing local artists. Dr. Seuss’ “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” is an upbeat, humorous and inspirational ode to life and the places it takes us. For many, these ‘places’ are geographical locations. For some, these ‘places’ are not physical at all. Rather, they may be social, emotional, spiritual ‘rooms’ to which we retreat to rest and relax, ponder, ask questions or be inspired. You're invited to come, be inspired, prodded, reminded, and encouraged just as Dr. Seuss encourages and inspires us in his book.

At The Mill Yard opening reception, local chef Jessi Peine's food truck, Peeps Hot Box, will be parked out front selling world street foods inspired by seasonal ingredients. Andrew Zimmern of Food Network said, "Peeps Hot Box is one of the best food trucks I've ever eaten at anywhere in the country." All attendees will receive an Izzy Buck to help satisfy your sweet tooth. Plus, the Misfits Coffee truck will be here too!

Facebook, Twitter, Contact: TheMillYard.Stonebridge@gmail.com

GALLERY AND ARTIST DETAILS:

Jim Dryden
The New House
Jim Dryden, a native of North Dakota, is a painter and sculptor. His work frequently deals with themes of partnership, connectedness and intimacy. He is a graduate of the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, a founding member of Form + Content Gallery, and a member artist of Traffic Zone Center for Visual Art. The pieces Jim has selected for The Mill Yard are specifically about time and place. 
“From the autobiographical series Love|Hate, these paintings represent a timeline of the places I come from, have been to, and hope to go. A farm in North Dakota, a white, clapboard, country church, a pink sand beach on Lake Superior, a secluded fish pond, a new home still in the dream stages. These are the times and places that connect me to my past, future, family, and community.” 
Jim’s art is represented in numerous collections including the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the University of Minnesota Tretter Collection, Walker Art Center, the Weisman Art Museum. Web site: http://www.jimdryden.net/
.
Margaret Grill
The Old Neighborhood Thanked HerMargaret Grill is a visual artist inspired by place, a sense of home, and landscape. She has worked as a visual artist for more than 10 years and exhibited with a diverse group of galleries and venues. In her own words she is “inspired by process, specifically the fluid, flexible, and messy process of painting. My initial inspiration is worked out through a repetitive progression of drawing, collage, and washes using water-soluble oils. Layering media allows me to illustrate complex ideas into a visual language. This process is then evident in my finished work, as the layers of paint appear in varying degrees of transparency, an effect that speaks to passing time, flux, and my hand as an artist. As a painter, I capture the change I see in the landscape, as I feel it allows me to better understand my place in the world. Change can be beautiful, exciting, unexpected and disconcerting.” 
She has selected art for The Mill Yard with the hope it inspires viewers to observe their own landscapes and ask questions about the changes they see. Web site:  mgrillpainting.com
.
Kevin Peters
Spring BloomKevin Peters Fine Art was born out of the conclusion that adding beauty to this world is indeed a worthwhile, venerable pursuit. Kevin began as a hobbyist landscape painter while living in southern Cambodia, but capturing what the eye sees and putting it on canvas quickly began to lose his interest. He wanted to begin “painting things not of this world...deeper things...things of the heart, soul, and, mind”. This desire, along with months of self-study, gave birth to Kevin’s signature abstract painting style. The Minneapolis-based artist has selected pieces for The Mill Yard that are created to represent the essence of the innermost “happy place,” sometimes called the soul.
 
“My hope is that each of these pieces fills you with a sense of tranquility and happiness, reminding you to take the time to go to your happy place... which may not be a literal place at all!”
Email: kevinpeters.fineart@gmail.com
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Jane Weis
Valley FarmJane Weis began her 25-year painting career with watercolor, then acrylic, and now oil and pastel. She has engaged in a range of artistic mediums including woodcut printing, designing and building furniture, cabinet making and museum archival framing. She considers herself a Midwestern regional artist and says, “much of my art is born from my affection for the rolling hills and deciduous trees of the Midwest.” Jane loves to travel for the excitement of new food, people, enormous cities, small towns, landscapes, vineyards and nature. And, “I love to come home.  To feel the peace and familiarity of coming home brings a unique joy to me.” The pieces she has selected for The Mill Yard are paintings and pastels of her rural landscapes, farmscapes, and sky paintings from Minnesota, Nebraska, Colorado and Maine. “All beautiful places.”  Web site:  janeweispaintings.com
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Sara Zhang
In Kitchen #1
‘By day,’ Sara Zhang is a NASA scientist in Washington, DC; however, she has been drawing and painting since she was a teenager in Shanghai, China, where she was born and raised.  Sara is primarily a self-taught artist, but travels the world for business and pleasure to study the work of ‘masters.’ With a trained mind and eye she analyzes what makes a work of art truly great, and then launches into the hard work of honing her creative skills.  Soft pastel is Sara’s preferred medium because it gives her the flexibility to express the fleeting moments she finds in everyday life.  The pieces specifically painted for The Mill Yard “Oh the Places You’ll Go” exhibit are of everyday kitchen scenes.
“I don’t think I am alone in feeling the kitchen is a favored room at home… In these little vignettes, I hope to evoke memories of tastes, smells, sounds, conversations and more; memories of when we connected with each other; memories of laughter and love.” Email: saraqzhang@gmail.com
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Tia Keo
Tia Keo has spent much of her life exploring the intersections of art, craft, design and architecture. Growing-up with architect father, David Salmela, meant she developed an artistic approach to engaging with the world from a young age. After graduating with a degree in architecture, she and her husband co-founded Silvercocoon as a means to work on creative projects across disciplines. Several years later she launched her laser cut jewelry collection under the Silvercocoon label with a solo-trunk show in the Walker Art Center shop. In 2017 she received a MN State Arts Board Grant to help her expand her jewelry practice into metal. The grant became a catalyst for creating new metal jewelry, expanding into metal sculpture, and for developing a daily watercolor practice that has exceeded 400 days. A solo exhibition “Three Sixty Five” will feature all the work she generated across disciplines in the span of a year at the American Swedish Institute from June 30 to August 5, 2018.  Web sites:  silvercocoon.com  &  tiakeoart.com
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The Mill Yard at Stonebridge Lofts

The Mill City. Residents celebrate our area’s industrial heritage of the mighty Mississippi River and the mills. Today, what we see are the most recognizable Minneapolis landmarks. However, this is only part of the story. Rail lines were key to Minneapolis’ growth, and were particularly integral to the Mill District, bringing in wheat and timber and shipping out flour and lumber. We also honor the history of the mills, the reason for the rail yard’s existence. The Mill Yard aims to be both a gathering place for art and artists and a conduit by which art can be shared with and disseminated into the wider community. 

The Mill Yard at Stonebridge Lofts thanks Luke Kleckner, Condo Development and Sales, for his generous sponsorship.

Saturday
Jul072018

Long Awaited Trader Joe’s To Open Friday, July 20

Article and photos by Merle Minda

There she sits: Not deterred by street construction and backed up traffic, Trader Joe’s is almost ready to open in downtown Minneapolis on Friday, July 20th. A pre-opening visit confirms that this will be a big and beautiful store, with a full-length wall of windows facing Washington Avenue that brings in astounding light, wide aisles just begging for browsing customers, and an energized and excited staff.

The new Trader Joe's doesn't seem to mind sharing the neighborhood woes of construction and traffic.

Trader Joe's store manager Melissa Laufer says, "We are thrilled to be here!"Everything is focused on the all-important customer, according to manager of the new store Melissa Laufer. Melissa is a resident of the Twin Cities, having moved here 11 years ago to open Trader Joe’s first Minnesota store in St. Louis Park. Now there are eight Twin Cities stores (and another in Rochester); this new store in downtown Minneapolis will be the ninth.

Located smack on the intersection of Washington and Chicago Avenues, the store is easy to walk, bike or drive to, with a good-sized parking lot - entrance on Chicago. Those cute red carts are already in place just waiting to be used. In addition to a 12,000 square foot grocery, Trader Joe’s also has an attached store for wine, beer and spirits, carrying many of their own beloved brands such as Wine Flower and Mangocini wines, Drive Thru Red Ale and Grand Reserve Chardonnay. And yes, the wine shop will be carrying the famous “two-buck Chuck”, Charles Shaw wines, albeit with a slightly increased price of $2.99.

“We see ourselves as being part of the neighborhood,” says Melissa. “We are so excited to be here and ready to create shopping adventures for our customers.” Walls of the store are dotted with original paintings depicting neighborhood spots – the Stone Arch Bridge, the Viking's Stadium and the Hennepin Avenue Bridge. Melissa was active in choosing these iconic subjects and it is a nice statement of Trader Joe’s commitment to becoming part of this neighborhood.

Original paintings of neighborhood landmarks dot the walls. 

The new Trader Joe’s is just a few blocks from the Stadium in one direction and the same distance from Guthrie Theater in the other.

Most of us are aware that Trader Joe’s has its own approach to the grocery store experience. 80% of their products are private label, manufactured by selected vendors who adhere to their perspective of no GMO’s (genetically modified organisms), no artificial preservatives and lots of organic products. Yet even with these restrictions, their prices fall below standard supermarket entries. My eyes lit on a 32-ounce box of carrot-ginger soup, just $2.99.

Those famous roses and other fresh flowers will be delivered daily, as will all the breads and bakery items. It’s quite an operation – the meat, poultry and fish shelving is empty now, as is the dairy section, waiting to be filled for those first customers. Trader Joe’s is also known for its fresh fruit, with those stanchions also now at the ready. You can prep by checking out www.traderjoes.com.

Unpacking and stocking shelves is well underway.

Interestingly, there is also a special spot for product and food demonstrations, which will happen every day, all day. Opening hours are 8:00 AM – 9:00 PM daily, with Sunday Wine Shop hours of 11:00 AM – 6:00 PM. The first hour of parking is free with Trader Joe’s validation.

Recently, Chowhound came out with a list of 50 favorite Trader Joe’s items – many of which are new to me and I can’t wait to grab for myself, like Gochujang Almonds, Mango & Sticky Rice Spring Rolls, Midnite Moo Chocolate Syrup, Green Dragon Sauce, Peanut Butter Filled Pretzels and Broccoli Slaw or Kohlrabi Salad. The store and its exciting product array are frankly, so tempting, that one thinks Whole Foods and Lunds & Byerlys will be on their competitive tippy-toes.

Most of our neighborhood folks will be checking out the new store for themselves, so at 8 AM on the morning of the 20th, grab your little red cart and go!

Trader Joe's red carts already lined up for shoppers.

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About Merle Minda

Journalist and free-lance writer Merle Minda writes about travel, business, people profiles and other subjects for a number of national and regional publications, including Delta SKY, Mpls/St. Paul Magazine, Twin Cities Business, Star Tribune, Twin Cities Statement, Minnesota Monthly, and now Mill City Times. She can be reached at mminda@earthlink.net or TravelOverEasy.com on the web.

Friday
Jul062018

Volunteer for Hennepin County Citizens Review Panel to Help with Complex Child Protection Services

Article by Claudia Kittock

One of the first things I noticed about living in the Mill District was the endless array of fascinating people I met. After 10 years of living here, I am still awed by the people here and the things they do. Vicki Underland-Rosow is one such person.

Vicki was born and raised in Austin, Minnesota, not far from my hometown. We discovered we had much in common, and she has opened my eyes to so many arenas in Minneapolis. I am endlessly indebted to her and the worlds she has opened to me.

Vicki contacted me recently with yet another area of interest. She is a member of the Hennepin County Citizens Review Panel. Citizen Review Panels are mandated by the federal government to provide child welfare programs with organized, sanctioned oversight. All members of the panel are appointed by the governor and serve for 2-year terms. The members of the panel are volunteers who devote their time and creative thinking to help children in the child protection system and their families. It is a huge undertaking (there were over 15,000 reports made to child protection in Hennepin County in 2014).

The work of the panel is to explore ways to help prevent children from being harmed further, and to help families learn to better care for their children. Offering an outside perspective on the internal workings of the child protection system could better safeguard children who have already been abused and neglected. It is also hoped that the panel will find ideas on ways families and communities can work together to better serve children.

While the panel works on many projects, some recent projects have included:

1) Implementation of the Family Assessment Model

2) Recidivism in the child protection system

3) The length of time spent by children in foster care

4) Use of past history in screening child protection reports

5) Recruitment, training and retention of foster and adoptive parents

6) Preventing child abuse and neglect in children ages 0 to 3

There is significant disparity in the numbers of minorities involved in child protection, and the panel is most interested in continued efforts to address the complex issues impacting this disparity. The culminating reports are sent to both the Hennepin County Commissioners and the Minnesota Department of Human Services.

The Citizens Review Panel members meet monthly, learning about the child protection system on a county level and about state statutes governing child protection. Speakers are brought in to educate the panel about new initiatives, staffing patterns, North Star Implementation, Indian Child Welfare Act, implementation of the new Family Assessment Model, etc. In addition to attending monthly meetings, each member will be a part of a small subgroup that chooses and researches a project for the year.

Community volunteers are needed to serve on this panel. Men and women from diverse backgrounds and perspectives who can work together to offer insight into how Hennepin County can better serve children in the child protection system are being sought. If you are interested, or know someone who may be interested, please contact Vicki Underland-Rosow at underlandrosow@gmail.com.

This is important work! We are stronger together, and working to protect children and think differently about the systems that handle this work matters. Please consider volunteering.

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About Claudia Kittock

Claudia is a resident of the Mill District. In addition to writing for Mill City Times, she is a founding Board Member of Friends of the Mill District. Claudia is the author of Health Through Chaos, mentors young adults at YouthLink, and has served on the Downtown Minneapolis Neighborhood Association (DMNA).
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Contact: claudia@millcitymedia.org

 

 

Friday
Jul062018

2018 Fringe Festival Updates

It's alive!

Explore the line up. Build your schedule. Plan you adventure at minnesotafringe.org.

And for the first time, you can choose between our signature Day Passes -- or purchase admission for a single show.

Because more choice means more adventure!

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Wait, what's this whole "single show versus Day Pass" thing?

Yes, it's new! Check out this video guide on this year's Festival admission options.

Grab a single show token for admission at the door -- it's just $10. Plus we guarantee a portion of the house will always be available for walk-up sales.

Like to plan? Great. Advanced reservations are $15.

OR...

Pay one price, and skip the lines for the rest of the day. Get your Fringe Binge on.
 
Weekday Day Passes: $19
Weekend Day Passes: $25

Regardless of your purchase, 70% of your ticket goes directly to the artists whose show(s) you're seeing!

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Fringe...with Benefits
 
Be part of the community helping Fringe go round, year-round. Buy now to take advantage of all offerings for the upcoming year. You’ll receive tickets to year-round Fringe programs and performances, a Festival VIP Pass ($220 value) -- good for any any show, any day, at any venue  -- a ticket to Five Fifths, and other goodies.

Learn more, and join now.

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We need YOU to make our Festival Season a success!

Volunteering is a powerful way to support our adventurous artists - while seeing shows for free! Sign up now to help.